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November 4, 2014

People, we need to educate ourselves and we should not trust too much the dairy industry or the FDA.

Obesity in kids

Got milk?

The dairy industry offers to chain kids to their chairs, give them computer games, plug kid’s ears with iPod music and feed them skim milk with the artificial sweeteners and coloring. This selfless act of kindness from the dairy industry is heart warming. It makes me feel good inside reading about this example of pure goodness of corporate world.

But this heroic move is not appreciated by some short sighted “experts” like doctors and school administrators. “”Perhaps we should just eliminate flavored milk from schools, as opposed to adding chemicals to it,” said Cooper, director of nutrition services for the Boulder Valley School District in Colorado.” What a fool! Doesn’t he understand that kids love sugared drinks?

Way to go dairy industry! I would propose as next step toward improving health of our precious children to genetically modify cows to give ready to use low fat sweetened pasteurized milk. Even better if the dairy industry would figure the way for cows to produce cash rather than milk.

Now it seems research shows that milk, any milk is not as beneficial as we thought.

WASHINGTON — In a new scientific review scheduled to appear in the March issue of the peer-reviewed journal, Pediatrics, Cornell-trained nutritionist Amy Joy Lanou, Ph.D., and co-authors show that dairy products do not promote bone health in children and young adults. Physical activity does have a positive impact on bone health, while evidence linking bone health with dairy product consumption is weak, at best. http://rense.com/general63/milkmyth.htm

Lead researcher Professor Karl Michaelsson said: “Our results may question the validity of recommendations to consume high amounts of milk to prevent fragility fractures.

“The results should, however, be interpreted cautiously given the observational design of our study.

“The findings merit independent ­replication before they can be used for dietary recommendations.”

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/528721/Drinking-milk-linked-to-earlier-death

Milk consumption may cause osteoporosis.

Not as healthy as advertised.

Evidently, drinking milk in general is not even as good for our bones as we thought. Ludwig points out that bone fracture rates tend to be lower in countries that do not consume milk, compared with those that do — while there are many other sources of calcium. http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/07/05/harvard-milk-study_n_3550063.html

Dairy milk is singled out as the biggest dietary cause of osteoporosis because more than any other food it depletes the finite reserve of bone-making cells in the body. So although milk makes bones stronger in the short term, in the long term it erodes bone-making cells, increasing the risk of osteoporosis. This explains a paradox: black people are known to be less tolerant to lactose in milk, and consequently they drink less milk, yet they get much less osteoporosis than white people. This new research resolves the paradox because by consuming less milk you are less likely to get osteoporosis.

http://www.news-medical.net/news/2005/09/12/13120.aspx

Cow’s milk: a cocktail of pus, hormones and antibiotics, pesticides, urea!

Various means to increase milk production cause induration and infection of the udder (mastitis) resulting in pus and bacteria in the milk. Paratuberculosis bacteria causes Johne’s disease in cattle and is believed to cause Crohn’s disease, (an illness that causes uncontrollable diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting) in humans. http://beforeitsnews.com/health/2014/02/milk-an-ecological-mismanagement-and-a-major-force-behind-todays-sicknesses-2523760.html

Serve only low-fat (1%) and fat-free (skim) milk –MYTH.

“The USDA suggests that everyone (including children over 2) drinks low-fat or fat-free milk claiming that they provide calcium and other nutrients without a lot of saturated fat.” The truth is that reduced fat milks are stripped of fats and fat-soluble vitamins that are essential to health, and the milk proteins are denatured and actually is made toxic by the skimming process. http://holisticsquid.com/milk-hero-or-villian/

Prevention and health.

Gym is good!

In my opinion we should limit the consumption of milk. Especially low fat and flavored milk.

We use fermented milk products that contains beneficial bacteria. The “pro-biotic” stuff.

And (in my opinion) children should not drink low fat or skim or whatever else this stuff is called. But whatever it is it is not milk.

We should move, work out, work in the garden, work with weights. Whatever you like. Just move!

And especially it is important for kids.

Milk is good – for babies. Their mother’s milk! Not the cow milk.

December 8, 2010

1. Milk is good for you.

Milk is good for your muscles

Good for you?

by David Zinczenko
Plenty of new research says that we should be drinking more milk, not less. In fact, swapping soda, juice, sweetened iced teas, and other beverages for milk might be one major reason why Americans are gaining weight at such a rapid pace. Milk not only helps boost protein intake and cut down on sugar, but consuming calcium through dairy foods such as milk may actually reduce the fat absorption from other foods. Who wouldn’t want that?
Milk is one of the best muscle foods on the planet. Milk is full of high-quality protein: about 80 percent casein and 20 percent whey. Whey is known as a “fast protein” because it’s quickly broken down into amino acids and absorbed into the bloodstream—perfect for post-workout consumption. Casein, on the other hand, is digested more slowly—ideal for providing your body with a steady supply of smaller amounts of protein for a longer period of time, such as between meals or while you sleep.
It is true that hormones and antibiotics have never been part of a cow’s natural diet, and they have been shown to have adverse effects on the animals. Canadian researchers, for example, discovered that cows given hormones are more likely to contract an udder infection called mastitis.
2. Milk is bad for you

Lactose intolerance

Got milk?

In our most recent past, American women have been consuming an average of two pounds of milk per day for their entire lives, yet thirty million American women have osteoporosis. Does this make sense?
In short, drinking milk does not prevent bone loss. The shocking part is that bone loss is actually accelerated by ingesting too much protein which forces the body to leech calcium from the bones to lower the acid level in the body. It’s not how much calcium you eat. It’s how much calcium you prevent from leaving your bones.
“Osteoporosis is caused by a number of things, one of the most important being too much dietary protein.”
Science 1986;233(4763)
“Countries with the highest rates of osteoporosis, such as the United States, England, and Sweden, consume the most milk. China and Japan, where people eat much less protein and dairy food, have low rates of osteoporosis.”
Nutrition Action Healthletter, June, 1993
“There is no significant association between teenaged milk consumption and the risk of adult fractures. Data indicate that frequent milk consumption and higher dietary calcium intakes in middle aged women do not provide protection against hip or forearm fractures… women consuming greater amounts of calcium from dairy foods had significantly increased risks of hip fractures, while no increase in fracture risk was observed for the same levels of calcium from nondairy sources.”
12-year Harvard study of 78,000 women American Journal of Public Health 1997;87
“Consumption of dairy products, particularly at age 20 years, were associated with an increased risk of hip fractures…metabolism of dietary protein causes increased urinary excretion of calcium. “
American Journal of Epidemiology 1994;139
Another factor is milk(lactose) digestion ability.
Human Biology, Oct 1997
“In most of the world’s population the ability to digest lactose declines sharply after infancy. High lactose digestion capacity in adults is common only in populations of European and circum-Mediterranean origin and is thought to be an evolutionary adaptation to millennia of drinking milk from domestic livestock.”
The physiological cause of high lactose digestion capacity (LDC) in adulthood is the retention of high levels of lactase in the small intestine beyond infancy (lactase persistance), which contrasts with the standard mammalian developmental pattern of a steep decline in small intestine lactose levels after infancy (Flatz 1987).
In other words to drink a lot of milk is not normal!
Milk can also be consumed in a processed form, such as cheese or soured milk, which has a reduced lactose content.
It appears milk may be good for your muscles but bad for your bones.
So my conclusion: If you like to drink milk-buy organic and drink it in moderation.

November 24, 2010

Soft drinks are bad for you

Soft drinks and obesity

Coke:

Put silver into Coke for 12 hours to let the stains dissolve; Polish silver with cotton cloth and then dry it.
Ever wondered how sodas affect your stomach?
Let`s consider what doctors and health clinics have to say about the dangers of drinking soft drinks.
If you look at the list of ingredients in most soda pops, you will likely see most or all of these listed:
caffeine
carbonated water
phosphoric acid
sugar or high fructose corn syrup
aspartame
acesulfame-k
sucralose
People drink more soft drinks

Soft drinks industry

The United States ranks first among countries in soft drink consumption.

According to the National Soft Drink Association (NSDA), consumption of soft drinks is now over 600 12-ounce servings (12 oz.) per person per year. Since the late 1970`s the soft drink consumption in the United States has doubled for females and tripled for males. The highest consumption is in the males between the ages of 12 – 29; they average 1/2 gallon a day or 160 gallons a year.
Drinking one or more carbonated beverages per day may increase your risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a new study published in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association.
The most commonly associated health risks are obesity, nutritional deficiencies, tooth decay, diabetes, osteoporosis and bone fractures, heart disease, food addictions, blood sugar disorders and other eating disorders, neurotransmitter dysfunction from chemical sweeteners, and neurological and adrenal disorders from excessive caffeine.
The relationship between soft drink consumption and body weight is so strong that researchers calculate that for each additional soft drink consumed, the risk of obesity increases 1.6 times.
Calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus must be maintained in the proper balance for bone health.  When too much phosphorus is in the blood, calcium is leached from the bones, causing osteoporosis.  Even in citrus sodas which contain citric acid instead of phosphoric acid, calcium is needed to normalize blood pH.  It has been said that the fastest growing group of people with osteoporosis in this country is teenagers….because of the huge number of sodas they consume.
Diet sodas that are low in calories are high in sodium. Too much salt in the diet may cause more calcium to be excreted in the urine and increase the risk of osteoporosis.
What about  ADHD in kids?

ADHD in kids

ADHD in kids

Most children diagnosed with ADHD are actually suffering from severe nutritional imbalances that can be easily corrected through changes in diet. Soft drinks are the single greatest source of caffeine in childrens diets; a 12-ounce can of cola contains about 45 mg
For anyone over age 40, soft drinks can be especially hazardous because the kidneys are less able to excrete excess phosphorus, causing depletion of vital calcium. Excessive consumption of soft drinks, which are high in phosphorus, can also deplete you of calcium and increase your chances of osteoporosis
So what to drink?
Water. But room temperature please. Don’t drink iced water.

Arthritus in America

Arthritis epidemic

Thursday, October 7, 2010

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – More than 22 percent of Americans have arthritis, with a million new cases being diagnosed every year, according to a new government estimate released on Thursday.
As the population ages, the problem will get worse and more expensive, too, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report said.
The CDC team used a large federal survey called the National Health Interview Survey, in which thousands of Americans are asked a battery of questions about their health.
Survey data from 2007 to 2009 showed 22 percent of Americans, or just under 50 million people, had arthritis diagnosed by a doctor, the CDC said in its weekly report on death and disease.
“After adjustment for age, arthritis prevalence was significantly higher among women (24.3 percent) than among men (18.2 percent),” the report reads.
Nearly 30 percent of the obese had arthritis, and those who exercised less, smoked more and who had lower levels of education were also more likely to have arthritis.
“Arthritis is a large and growing public health problem in the United States, resulting in costs of $128 billion annually, and continues to be the most common cause of disability,” the report reads.
“With the aging population and continued high prevalence of obesity in the United States, the prevalence of arthritis is expected to increase significantly over the next 2 decades,” the CDC added in a commentary on the report.
More than two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese.
“Compared with previous estimates, the number of adults with arthritis increased, but not significantly, from 46.4 million during 2003-2005 to 49.9 million during 2007-2009, an increase of approximately 1 million adults per year.”
The usual recommendations: Eat less
Exercise more
Watch TV less
Eat vegetables more
Educate yourself more!
By eating more junk you make yourself sick and Big Pharma rich.
Nice going America.

New research suggests a link between women’s exposure to household insecticides — including roach and mosquito killers — and the autoimmune disorders rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.
The scientist did not find a direct cause-and-effect relationship between insecticide exposure and the illnesses, and it’s possible that the women have something else in common that accounts for their higher risk. But epidemiologist Christine Parks, lead investigator of the study, said the findings do raise a red flag.
“It’s hard to envision what other factors might explain this association,” said Parks, an epidemiologist with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences who was to present the study over the weekend at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Philadelphia.
Previous research has linked agricultural pesticides to higher risk of rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, two diseases in which the immune system goes haywire and begins to attack the body. Farmers, among others, appear to be vulnerable.
Parks and her colleagues wanted to find out whether smaller doses of insecticides, such as those people might encounter at home from either personal or commercial residential use, might have a similar effect.
The researchers examined data from a previous study of almost 77,000 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79.
Women who reported applying insecticides or mixing them — about half — had a higher risk of developing the two autoimmune disorders than women who reported no insecticide use. This was the case whether or not they had lived on a farm. Those who used or mixed the insecticides the most — judged by frequency or duration — had double the risk.
Even so, the risk of developing the diseases remained very low. Overall, Parks said, about 2 percent of older adults develop the conditions.
Parks said the insecticides that the women used included insect killers, such as those designed to eradicate ants, wasps, termites, mosquitoes and roaches. They didn’t include insect repellents.
It is hard to avoid the chemicals in our lives. But we should be aware of risks.
Also I would suggest the product we are taking for two years now.

New research suggests a link between women’s exposure to household insecticides — including roach and mosquito killers — and the autoimmune disorders rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

The scientist did not find a direct cause-and-effect relationship between insecticide exposure and the illnesses, and it’s possible that the women have something else in common that accounts for their higher risk. But epidemiologist Christine Parks, lead investigator of the study, said the findings do raise a red flag.
“It’s hard to envision what other factors might explain this association,” said Parks, an epidemiologist with the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences who was to present the study over the weekend at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Philadelphia.

Previous research has linked agricultural pesticides to higher risk of rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, two diseases in which the immune system goes haywire and begins to attack the body. Farmers, among others, appear to be vulnerable.

Parks and her colleagues wanted to find out whether smaller doses of insecticides, such as those people might encounter at home from either personal or commercial residential use, might have a similar effect.
The researchers examined data from a previous study of almost 77,000 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79.

Women who reported applying insecticides or mixing them — about half — had a higher risk of developing the two autoimmune disorders than women who reported no insecticide use. This was the case whether or not they had lived on a farm. Those who used or mixed the insecticides the most — judged by frequency or duration — had double the risk.
Even so, the risk of developing the diseases remained very low. Overall, Parks said, about 2 percent of older adults develop the conditions.
Parks said the insecticides that the women used included insect killers, such as those designed to eradicate ants, wasps, termites, mosquitoes and roaches. They didn’t include insect repellents.It is hard to avoid the chemicals in our lives. But we should be aware of risks.

Also I would suggest the product we are taking for two years now.

June 28, 2010

The carbonation in all soft drinks causes calcium loss in the bones through a three-stage process:
The carbonation irritates the stomach.
The stomach “cures” the irritation the only way it knows how. It adds the only antacid at its disposal: calcium. It gets this from the blood.
The blood, now low on calcium, replenishes its supply from the bones. If it did not do this, muscular and brain function would be severely impaired.
But, the story doesn’t end there. Another problem with most soft drinks is they also contain phosphoric acid (not the same as the carbonation, which is carbon dioxide mixed with the water). This substance also causes a drawdown on the store of calcium.
So, soft drinks soften your bones (actually, they make them weak and brittle) in three ways:
Carbonation reduces the calcium in the bones.
Phosphoric acid reduces the calcium in the bones.
The beverage replaces a calcium-containing alternative, such as milk or water. Milk and water are not excellent calcium sources, but they are sources.
Diabetes in a can
The picture gets worse when you add sugar to the soft drink. The sugar, dissolved in liquid, is quickly carried to the bloodstream, where its presence in overload quantities signals the pancreas to go into overdrive. The pancreas has no way of knowing if this sugar inrush is a single dose or the front-end of a sustained dose. The assumption in the body’s chemical controls is the worst-case scenario. To prevent nerve damage from oxidation, the pancreas pumps out as much insulin as it can. Even so, it may not prevent nerve damage.
But, this heroic effort of the pancreas has a hefty downside. The jolt of insulin causes the body to reduce the testosterone in the bloodstream, and to depress further production of it. In both men and women, testosterone is the hormone that controls the depositing of calcium in the bones. You can raise testosterone through weight-bearing exercise, but if you are chemically depressing it via massive sugar intake (it takes very small quantities of sugar to constitute a massive intake, because refined sugar is not something the human body is equipped to handle), then your body won’t add calcium to the bones.
Add this to what we discussed above, and you can see that drinking sweetened colas is a suicidal endeavor. And now you know why bone damage formerly apparent only in the very old is now showing up in teenagers.

The carbonation in all soft drinks causes calcium loss in the bones through a three-stage process:The carbonation irritates the stomach.The stomach “cures” the irritation the only way it knows how. It adds the only antacid at its disposal: calcium. It gets this from the blood.The blood, now low on calcium, replenishes its supply from the bones. If it did not do this, muscular and brain function would be severely impaired.But, the story doesn’t end there. Another problem with most soft drinks is they also contain phosphoric acid (not the same as the carbonation, which is carbon dioxide mixed with the water). This substance also causes a drawdown on the store of calcium.So, soft drinks soften your bones (actually, they make them weak and brittle) in three ways:Carbonation reduces the calcium in the bones.Phosphoric acid reduces the calcium in the bones.The beverage replaces a calcium-containing alternative, such as milk or water. Milk and water are not excellent calcium sources, but they are sources.Diabetes in a canThe picture gets worse when you add sugar to the soft drink. The sugar, dissolved in liquid, is quickly carried to the bloodstream, where its presence in overload quantities signals the pancreas to go into overdrive. The pancreas has no way of knowing if this sugar inrush is a single dose or the front-end of a sustained dose. The assumption in the body’s chemical controls is the worst-case scenario. To prevent nerve damage from oxidation, the pancreas pumps out as much insulin as it can. Even so, it may not prevent nerve damage.
But, this heroic effort of the pancreas has a hefty downside. The jolt of insulin causes the body to reduce the testosterone in the bloodstream, and to depress further production of it. In both men and women, testosterone is the hormone that controls the depositing of calcium in the bones. You can raise testosterone through weight-bearing exercise, but if you are chemically depressing it via massive sugar intake (it takes very small quantities of sugar to constitute a massive intake, because refined sugar is not something the human body is equipped to handle), then your body won’t add calcium to the bones.
Add this to what we discussed above, and you can see that drinking sweetened colas is a suicidal endeavor. And now you know why bone damage formerly apparent only in the very old is now showing up in teenagers.

I know that some people use calcium supplements and drink carbonated beverages.

Sounds a little counterproductive to you?

January 15, 2010

Time January 18 2010

 It was a heretical idea. After all, we have had a long-standing deal with biology: whatever choices we make during our lives might ruin our short-term memory or make us fat or hasten death, but they won’t change our genes — our actual DNA. Which meant that when we had kids of our own, the genetic slate would be wiped clean. Bygren and other scientists have now amassed historical evidence suggesting that powerful environmental conditions (near death from starvation, for instance) can somehow leave an imprint on the genetic material in eggs and sperm. These genetic imprints can short-circuit evolution and pass along new traits in a single generation.
Meet the Epigenome
The answer lies beyond both nature and nurture. Bygren’s data — along with those of many other scientists working separately over the past 20 years — have given birth to a new science called epigenetics. At its most basic, epigenetics is the study of changes in gene activity that do not involve alterations to the genetic code but still get passed down to at least one successive generation
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1951968,00.html#ixzz0ciX46QXt

Guess what?You actually may be able to prolong your life or to have a better quality life by using Anti-Aging products.

osteoporosis.jpgOsteoporosis: A debilitating disease that can be prevented and treated.
The National Osteoporosis Foundation offers this list of risk factors for osteoporosis:
Being older or female. While women are four times more likely than men to develop the disease, men also suffer from osteoporosis.
Having osteoporosis in the family.
Having a small stature or thin frame.
Being white, Asian or Hispanic.
Having a prior bone fracture.
Having low sex hormones.
Getting insufficient exercise.
Getting insufficient dietary Calcium and Vitamin D. calciumplus.jpg
Eating a diet that’s high in caffeine, sodium and protein.
Using alcohol or tobacco.
Having eating disorders or rheumatoid arthritis.
Using certain drugs, such as steroids.

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