Wellness Forum by Dead Sea Herbs

Health and wellness for all

Site Search:

Better than drugs

Author: Yoselin
December 9, 2010


 


prevention of diabetes

Run from Diabetes!

The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major multicenter clinical research study aimed at discovering whether modest weight loss through dietary changes and increased physical activity or treatment with the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in study participants. At the beginning of the DPP, participants were all overweight and had blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes—a condition called pre-diabetes.
 
The DPP found that participants who lost a modest amount of weight through dietary changes and increased physical activity sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes.
Taking metformin also reduced risk, although less dramatically. The DPP resolved its research questions earlier than projected and, following the recommendation of an external monitoring board, the study was halted a year early. The researchers published their findings in the February 7, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
The study of two groups.
The first group, called the lifestyle intervention group, received intensive training in diet, physical activity, and behavior modification. By eating less fat and fewer calories and exercising for a total of 150 minutes a week, they aimed to lose 7 percent of their body weight and maintain that loss.
The second group took 850 mg of metformin twice a day.
The third group received placebo pills instead of metformin. The metformin and placebo groups also received information about diet and exercise but no intensive motivational counseling. A fourth group was treated with the drug troglitazone (Rezulin), but this part of the study was discontinued after researchers discovered that troglitazone can cause serious liver damage. The participants in this group were followed but not included as one of the intervention groups.
The first group—those receiving intensive individual counseling and motivational support on effective diet, exercise, and behavior modification—reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent. This finding was true across all participating ethnic groups and for both men and women. Lifestyle changes worked particularly well for participants aged 60 and older, reducing their risk by 71 percent. About 5 percent of the lifestyle intervention group developed diabetes each year during the study period, compared with 11 percent of those in the placebo group.
The second group taking metformin reduced their risk of developing diabetes by 31 percent. Metformin was effective for both men and women, but it was least effective in people aged 45 and older. Metformin was most effective in people 25 to 44 years old and in those with a body mass index of 35 or higher, meaning they were at least 60 pounds overweight. About 7.8 percent of the metformin group developed diabetes each year during the study, compared with 11 percent of the group receiving the placebo.
Metformin possible side effects (drugs.com)

Prevention works better than pills

Would rather go for a walk

Possible side effects using Metformin:

Diarrhea; gas; headache; indigestion; nausea; stomach upset; temporary metallic taste; vomiting.
Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur when using Metformin:
Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue); chest pain or discomfort; dizziness or lightheadedness; fast or difficult breathing; feeling of being unusually cold; fever, chills, or persistent sore throat; general feeling of being unwell; muscle pain or weakness; slow or irregular heartbeat; unusual drowsiness; unusual or persistent stomach pain or discomfort; unusual tiredness or weakness.
So again eat right and exercise! And don’t use pills if you don’t have to! But you can try natural supplements.

October 22, 2010

Weight gain and diabetes

Forget the escalators! Walk!

Our Gym is on the second floor.

And most take the escalator. And then they go on the treadmill!

Forget the escalator! Walk!

What is wrong with us?

Every day I see parents DRIVING their kids half the block to the school bus.

Does this make any sense?

(Reuters Life!) – Up to a third of U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050 if Americans continue to gain weight and avoid exercise, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projected on Friday.

The numbers are certain to go up as the population gets older, but they will accelerate even more unless Americans change their behavior, the CDC said.
“We project that, over the next 40 years, the prevalence of total diabetes (diagnosed and undiagnosed) in the United States will increase from its current level of about one in 10 adults to between one in five and one in three adults in 2050,” the CDC’s James Boyle and colleagues wrote in their report.
“These are alarming numbers that show how critical it is to change the course of type-2 diabetes,” CDC diabetes expert Ann Albright said in a statement.
“Successful programs to improve lifestyle choices on healthy eating and physical activity must be made more widely available because the stakes are too high and the personal toll too devastating to fail.”
The CDC says about 24 million U.S. adults have diabetes now, most of them type-2 diabetes linked strongly with poor diet and lack of exercise.
Boyle’s team took census numbers and data on current diabetes cases to make models projecting a trend. No matter what, diabetes will become more common, they said.
“These projected increases are largely attributable to the aging of the U.S. population, increasing numbers of members of higher-risk minority groups in the population, and people with diabetes living longer,” they wrote.
Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2007, and is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults under age 75, as well as kidney failure, and leg and foot amputations not caused by injury.
“Diabetes, costing the United States more than $174 billion per year in 2007, is expected to take an increasingly large financial toll in subsequent years,” Boyle’s team wrote.

By  Su Rollins

What effect does exercise have on glucose levels? It is quite easy to manage diabetes when you incorporate a program for exercise in your daily routine. Such exercises have been shown to have positive effects for people who are suffering from diabetes, especially those who have low glucose levels. One example is exercise being able to channel muscle energy, convert it into glucose and then using that glucose as fuel. At the start of it, the body will just use the glucose that has been converted into glycogen from one’s muscles. Glucose is also found in your bloodstream. If you maintain a long term exercise program, it is highly likely that the levels of your blood glucose will not dip. Also, glucagon and other hormones found in your body will also be released. These hormones and glucagon work together and break down all of the liver’s stored fat and then converting such stored fat into more glucose. It is best that you engage in exercise frequently, because your body will improve. It will develop a sensitivity to insulin, as well as help you gain better control of the body’s glycemic index.

Why is the effect of exercise on glucose levels important to those with type 2 diabetes?Exercise indeed has a good effect on a patient’s glucose level. This is good news for people who have type 2 diabetes. A lot of research indicates that patients of diabetes gain more control over their glycemic as soon as they get used to a regular exercise program. On the other hand, people who do not engage in exercise find no improvement on their glycemic control. Since exercise improves your insulin sensitivity, you will also need less medicines in order to control the levels of your blood sugar.

Should patients with type 2 diabetes exercise more often or differently than otherwise healthy people?To maintain general health, experts recommend at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 90 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity spread over 3 or more days per week. There are no separate recommendations for those with diabetes.What type of exercise is best for type 2 diabetes patients?In light of this, the frequency of the routine is more important that the kinds of exercise one engages in. There are many researches wherein an abundance of benefits result from both weight training as well as aerobic activity.When should patients be discouraged from exercising?If you are high risk for cardiac arrest or engage in too stressful exercise, you should get cautioned and adapt to it slowly.

About the Author – Su Rollins writes for hypoglycemic diet , her personal hobby blog focused on tips to prevent and cure hypoglycemia using the right diet and nutrition.

Contact Us

Recent Posts

Marco Island Condo

flipkey

Directories