Wellness Forum by Nathan Kagan

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August 9, 2011

Omega 3 with vitamin E

Highest quality

Recent research has shown that fish oil may be beneficial in supporting cognitive function by helping the body manage stress and enhance mood. It may also promote a healthy complexion. In an article published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the effects of omega-3 fish oil supplementation was shown to be beneficial for healthy cognitive and cardiac functioning. The study shows that supplementing with fish oil daily can rapidly raise the levels of EPA and DHA in cardiac tissue. This is important because both EPA and DHA have been proven to help maintain normal plasma triglycerides. In addition, DHA has been shown to help maintain blood pressure and blood viscosity. This study also showed an inverse relationship between EPA/DHA and arachidonic acid (AA), an omega-6 fatty acid. As EPA and DHA increased in atrial (heart tissue) phospholipids, AA decreased.1

Omega 3 fish oil supplement for expecting mothers.

Omega 3 fish oil

Healthy

For good or ill, everything mothers do during pregnancy affects the health of their babies. That includes taking daily supplements, according to a new study that found that children born to mothers who take fish-oil pills while pregnant may benefit from an early boost in immunity.

Researchers randomly assigned about 1,000 pregnant women to take daily supplements of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a major omega-3 fatty acid in fish oil, or a placebo. The babies’ health was evaluated when they were 1 month, 3 months and 6 months old. At every stage, babies whose mothers took fish-oil pills were healthier than those whose mothers didn’t. At 1 month, they were 24% less likely to have cold symptoms such as coughing, nasal congestion and runny noses. At 3 months, they were 14% less likely to be sick. By 6 months, infants whose mothers had taken DHA developed cold symptoms as often as babies whose moms took the placebo, but their colds didn’t last as long.

In the study, expectant mothers got 400 mg of DHA daily, starting at 18 to 22 weeks, which is significantly more than the 200 mg that the average American woman consumes in a day.

Sources: Pediatrics; Journal of Family Practice; Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine; U.N.

THURSDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) — The tuna sushi that you order in restaurants may have higher concentrations of mercury than the sushi you buy at your local supermarket, a new study finds.
Supermarkets tend to sell sushi made from yellowfin tuna, which contains less mercury than other tuna species, researchers report.
“We found that mercury levels are linked to specific species,” Jacob Lowenstein, a graduate student working with the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, said in a news release from the museum. “So far, the U.S. does not require restaurants and merchants to clarify what species they are selling or trading, but species names and clearer labeling would allow consumers to exercise greater control over the level of mercury they [consume],” he added.
For their study, the researchers combined two efforts: DNA barcoding performed at the museum to identify specific species; and a mercury content analysis from experts at Rutgers University. The report was published online April 21 in Biology Letters.
“People who eat fish frequently have a particular need to know which species may be high in contaminants,” said Michael Gochfeld, professor at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey. “Some agencies have been afraid that any mention of contaminants will discourage people from eating any fish.”
Higher mercury levels were found in bigeye tuna and bluefin akami, which is a lean, dark red tuna, than in bluefin toro, a fatty tuna, and yellowfin tuna akami, the researchers said. Mercury tends to accumulate in muscle rather than fat, so mercury content is usually — but not always — higher in leaner fish. Yellowfin tuna, for example, is lean, but may accumulate less mercury because it is smaller and harvested earlier than other species, they said.
What Makes Heart Health™ Essential Omega III Fish Oil with Vitamin E Unique?
Heart Health Essential Omega III with Vitamin E is a superior product due to a number of factors. The best fish are used to produce a clean and safe product that is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It also contains 3000mg of fish oil where most other commercial products contain a third of the total fish oil contained in Heart Health Essential Omega III. Heart Health Essential Omega III comes from small fish where other competitive products use large fish which are more likely to accumulate toxins. Heart Health Essential Omega III provides a high quality, high purity product with significant percentages of the health promoting EPA and DHA.

April 16, 2010

Heart Health Essential Omega III with Vitamin E is a superior product due to a number of factors. The best fish are used to produce a clean and safe product that is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). It also contains 3000mg of fish oil where most other commercial products contain a third of the total fish oil contained in Heart Health Essential Omega III. Heart Health Essential Omega III comes from small fish where other competitive products use large fish which are more likely to accumulate toxins. Heart Health Essential Omega III provides a high quality, high purity product with significant percentages of the health promoting EPA and DHA.

Evidence is rapidly accumulating that specific components of food, alone or in combination with one another, have potent effects upon prevention of a wide variety of neoplasms. Bioactive food components in cancer prevention have been studied, and the complexity of the issue is daunting. Reviewing the potential nutrient modifiers of prostate cancer illustrates the complexity, especially given the difficulties in using blood levels to measure their response, their intake, and their actions. Nutrient modifiers being studied for prostate cancer include: allylsulfides, considered the most important potential nutrient modifier; calcium and Vitamin D (the latter causes differentiation and regulates calcium metabolism); epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), obtained from tea and related compounds (this modifier has been related to prostate cancer prevalence); fatty acids found in fish, which appear to relate to the decrease in prostate cancer with fish intake; genistein from soy, which has estrogenic activities and appears to be an important agent in prostate cancer prevention; indole-3-carbinol, found in cruciferous vegetables (its metabolites are not themselves potent hormones but influence hormone metabolism); lycopene, found in tomatoes and tomato products; resveratrol, found in grapes and ancient Chinese weeds, has at least eight actions that are protective against cancer and some that are protective against heart disease; selenium, whose importance is supported by basic science and for which translational research is now being done;

Vitamin A, whose uptake and binding are being explored; and

Vitamin E. Measurement of the serum levels of these agents often provides an insensitive, inaccurate, or misleading index of dietary intake. Why is it difficult to measure the responses of these nutrient modifiers using blood samples? A good example of the difficulty can be seen by reviewing the metabolism of garlic, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin E.

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