Wellness Forum by Nathan Kagan

Health and wellness for all

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June 4, 2015

Paying the Price for Those Extra Pounds

“Excess weight harms health in many ways. It increases the risk of developing conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis and some cancers, to name just a few, and reduces one’s life span. Treating obesity and obesity-related conditions costs billions of dollars a year. By one estimate, the U.S. spent $190 billion on obesity-related health care expenses in 2005—double previous estimates. (1) The enormity of this economic burden and the huge toll that excess weight takes on health and well-being are beginning to raise global political awareness that individuals, communities, states, nations, and international organizations must do more to stem the rising tide of obesity.” http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/obesity-consequences/economic/

Two extremes are equally bad.

Overweight and proud of it? Really? I think it is a convenient excuse to be lazy.

Yes, there are overweight people who are sick and just cannot loose weight.

But the majority just live and eat unhealthily and don’t have the drive to do something about being obese.

And these obese models are giving these lazy, overweight people a good excuse to do nothing about their problem.

Considering that we already have an obesity epidemic, promoting obesity as a norm contributes greatly to the problem.

 

 

Obese model

She is sick.

Both extremes are bad

Equally bad.

Americans are living large. Extra large. As in XXXXL large size. As in baby-powdered-thighs large. As in wheezing, heaving, bust-the-car-suspension large. Overweight has become the new normal and society is straining to accommodate our ever-expanding waistlines. We plant plush bottoms on wider seats in theaters and toilet stalls, drape ourselves in plus-sized clothing, even go to our eternal rest in broader coffins. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than two-thirds of Americans are overweight and a third, some 72 million people, are considered obese. From 1980 to 2008, obesity rates doubled for adults and tripled for children, with 17 percent, or 9 million children over 6, classified as obese. http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/2011-06-12/news/fl-overweight-new-normal-20110601_1_apparel-size-vanity-sizing-obesity-rates

And please don’t give these lame excuses like, “I love myself the way I am”. In my opinion if you love yourself you will take care of yourself. Why do you go to school, college, style your hair, buy nice clothes and shave your legs if you love yourself just the way you are? It is a known fact that overweight people get sick more often and die sooner. Is that how you love yourself? That you are willing to die sooner?

The only way to deal with a problem is to name it, to admit that you have a problem and to do one’s best to overcome, to defeat the problem. That’s what love means.

 

US Adult Obesity Rate Rises Again. https://www.yahoo.com/health/us-adult-obesity-rate-rises-again-109302297992.html
Walmart contributes to obesity.
Fat on the junk food.

Get up and walk! Skip the junk!

A new report puts some of the blame for Americans’ expanding waistlines on the growth of new Wal-Mart supercenters in the US.

“We live in an environment with increasingly cheap and readily available junk food,” Charles Courtemanche, an assistant professor of economics at Georgia State University and one of the report’s co-authors, told the Washington Post. “We buy in bulk. We tend to have more food around. It takes more and more discipline and self-control to not let that influence your weight.”
http://www.businessinsider.com/report-ties-wal-mart-to-american-obesity-2015-1#ixzz3QFJtbKg8

Matter of national security.

Obesity and national security.

US military of the future.

Mission: Readiness, an organization of retired military leaders, has reported that 27 percent of today’s young adults are too fat to serve in the military, causing concern about the strength of the nation’s future military. http://www.prb.org/Publica

http://www.prb.org/Publications/Articles/2013/us-obesity-military.aspx

The new data shows that if current trends continue, 43 percent of U.S. adults will be obese and obesity spending will quadruple to $344 billion by 2018. However, if obesity rates are instead held at current levels, the U.S. would save nearly $200 billion in health care costs. http://www.fightchronicdisease.org/media-center/releases/new-data-shows-obesity-costs-will-grow-344-billion-2018

World shifts focus to hidden hunger as global obesity expands.
The study’s authors emphasize that obesity and other derivatives of poor nutrition -- collectively termed "hidden hunger"-- have become increasingly important issues as traditional hunger has eroded. The ODI found increased consumption of meats, sugars, fats and oils across the globe and noted that “increasingly, the concern is less about macro-nutrition and more about micro-nutrition.” 
Food waste due to logistics

Lost in transition.

Food loss due in part to centralization and over eating.

In 2011, 1.3 billion tons of food, or about one third of all the food produced globally, was lost or wasted annually, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN. In developed countries, the average person wastes about 100 kilograms of food every year.

Locally grown food would help.

Research shows that based on average weight gain through adulthood, 

people are consuming 20 to 30 per cent too many calories. So eating a healthier, more balanced diet would not only help tackle the obesity epidemic, it would also take as much as a third of the caloric demands out of the global food chain. http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/food-waste-overeating-threaten-global-security-1.2436729

Highly centralized distribution of products.

Above is just one example of our current economic model that is unsustainable.

So what is the solution?

Designing for quality of life defined by experiential and social wealth, not material wealth.” (Further Reading) We often define “quality of life” in terms of material consumption–something that it seems fairly clear will decline due to energy descent. But is material consumption really what gives our lives quality? Our current system is geared toward maximizing production and consumption–how can it be redesigned to instead maximize our health, our happiness, the vibrancy of our communities and other sources of true “quality” of life?” http://www.resilience.org/stories/2010-05-02/promise-decentralization-localization-and-scale-free-self-sufficiency

                  Technology can help.

3D printing.

As applications of technology expand and prices drop, the first big implication is that more goods will be manufactured at or close to their point of purchase or consumption. This might even mean household-level production of some things. (You’ll pay for raw materials and the IP–the software files for any designs you can’t find free on the web). Short of that, many goods that have relied on the scale efficiencies of large, centralized plants will be produced locally. Even if the per-unit production cost is higher, it will be more than offset by the elimination of shipping and of buffer inventories. Whereas cars today are made by just a few hundred factories around the world, they might one day be made in every metropolitan area. Parts could be made at dealerships, repair shops and assembly plants could eliminate the need for supply chain management by making components as needed. https://hbr.org/2013/03/3-d-printing-will-change-the-world

Power grids and local power production.

New technologies like micro-nuclear power generations and efficient and affordable solar energy.

New research in orbiting solar power stations.

Cars printed on demand locally.

http://www.fool.com/investing/general/2015/01/31/3d-printing-news-worlds-first-3d-printing-car-fact.aspx

Please read more: Here is one of my articles about the new approach to a sustainable economic model based on new technology and new thinking of what makes us happy.

http://democracyinactionblog.com/?s=+sustainable+economic+model+

January 23, 2015

Bad example

Daily Wisdom

“The weight of our nation’s population is increasing, causing a rise in the incidence of noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular conditions and diabetes,” said Suzy Harrington, DNP, RN, MCHES, director of ANA’s Department for Health, Safety and Wellness. “And it is affecting the health of nurses personally and professionally.”

Added Susan Gallagher, PhD, RN, CSPHP, CBN, “Certainly there are many very healthy nurses who happen to be overweight or obese. However, the data suggest that, like the general population, nurses of size may face some obesity-related health risks.” http://www.theamericannurse.org/index.php/2013/03/01/an-issue-of-weight/

I went to an annual checkup recently and there are some observations. Most of the nurses and other medical personnel (I don't know who they are) do not look healthy.
The nurses in doctor's office looked overweight and out of shape. And I am asking myself: if the medical professionals do not know how to stay healthy how are they going to help me to stay healthy?
How can I trust them? And then I remembered. They are not "healthcare" professionals. They are sickness care professionals. 
It seems the health establishment in western society is using an upside-down model of healthcare.
Priority in my opinion should be on prevention. Our health professionals should be proactive, not reactive. And it is a huge and very expensive problem.
This backward approach is changing slowly and there are provisions in Obamacare that are prioritizing prevention. But we should not wait, we, the people should be responsible for our health. 
Healthy lifestyle and eating habits will help in most cases 
So my friend please educate yourselves. Help yourselves and stay healthy! 

Obesity

Author: Nathan
June 16, 2010

Statement of
Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S.
Surgeon General
U.S. Public Health Service
Acting Assistant Secretary for Health
Department of Health and Human Services
“Looking back 40 years to the 1960s, when many of us in this room were children, just over four percent of 6- to 17-year-olds were overweight. Since then, that rate has more than tripled, to over 15 percent. And the problem doesn’t go away when children grow up. Nearly three out of every four overweight teenagers may become overweight adults.
I’m not willing to stand by and let that happen. American children deserve much better than being condemned to a lifetime of serious, costly, and potentially fatal medical complications associated with excess weight. The facts are staggering:”
In the year 2000, the total annual cost of obesity in the United States was $117 billion. While extra value meals may save us some change at the counter, they’re costing us billions of dollars in health care and lost productivity. Physical inactivity and super-sized meals are leading to a nation of oversized people.
This year, more than 300,000 Americans will die from illnesses related to overweight and obesity.
Obesity contributes to the number-one cause of death in our nation: heart disease.
Excess weight has also led to an increase in the number of people suffering from Type 2 diabetes. There are at least 17 million Americans with diabetes, and another 16 million have pre-diabetes. Each year, diabetes costs America $132 billion. It can lead to eye diseases, cardiovascular problems, kidney failure, and early death.
Despite seeing the likes of Paris Hilton and Lindsey Lohan on television nearly everyday, America has become an obese nation. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 34% of adults in America are obese, while the number of obese children in America is at 17%. Clearly, America has become an unhealthy nation, too busy with video games and cell phones to be concerned with nutrition and health.
How a Person is Determined to be Obese
Not everyone understands how doctors determine a person to be obese. Certainly, weight is a factor, but what other aspects are involved? Obesity is determined based upon a person’s Body Mass Index (BMI), a ratio based on one’s height and weight. A person is considered obese if their BMI is over 30%. Therefore, a person that is five-foot-six and weighs 180 pounds would be considered obese (nytimes.com).
Obesity, cancer clearly linked, experts say
News Date: 04/08/2010
Outlet: Dallas Morning News
There is a clear correlation between obesity and cancer, according to a November report by the American Institute for Cancer Research. It went so far as to link excess body weight to more than 100,000 cancers in the U.S. annually.
Researchers from the American Cancer Society cited this connection as far back as 2003.
In fact, the only issue in doubt among most experts is why.
Some say increased weight causes an increase in the amount of hormones, such as estrogen, or an increase in low-grade inflammation in the body, both of which are theorized to increase cancer risk.
Dr. David Euhus, professor of surgical oncology at UT Southwestern Medical Center and director of the Cancer Genetics and Risk Assessment Program at the Simmons Cancer Center, believes the true culprit is insulin resistance, which increases with weight gain and a sedentary lifestyle.
“Breast cancer risk increases in the years prior to a diagnosis of diabetes,” says Euhus, who is working with researchers at UT Southwestern to explore his ideas. “Women with higher levels of circulating insulin have higher breast cancer rates.”
Euhus is examining medicines such as Metformin, which heightens insulin sensitivity, as possible cancer preventives.
DMN

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